Architectural Technologies

Diploma

Program Overview

Architectural technologists are involved at every stage of building design and construction, from blueprints to building codes and from interior design to space planning. It’s a great career for detail-oriented, visual thinkers who enjoy working in a technology-driven environment. You’ll be able to work in residential, commercial and institutional design and construction.

Architectural Technologies is a three-year diploma offered full time at Saskatchewan Polytechnic Moose Jaw campus. It includes five academic semesters and three four-month Co-operative Education work terms. The program offers two areas of concentration: Building Sciences and Interior Design. The first three semesters are common to both areas. You’ll focus on residential design and wood frame construction (National Building Code - Part 9), and build knowledge and skills in:

  • properties and function of construction materials
  • criteria and methods of building construction and design
  • preparation of construction documents
  • construction contract administration

In your fourth and fifth semesters, you’ll focus in on your chosen area. In Building Science, you’ll receive an introduction to commercial and institutional building construction with emphasis on construction detailing and methods, structural systems, environmental controls and the building envelope (National Building Code - Parts 3 and 4).

In Interior Design, you’ll receive an introduction to commercial and institutional interior construction with an emphasis on interior finishes, detailing and methods, space planning, lighting design and material selection (National Building Code - Parts 3 and 4).

Your co-operative work term counts as courses. You pay tuition and receive credit, but you also get paid. It’s a great way to gain valuable experience while earning a salary.

The Co-op Work Term Advantage

Co-operative work terms are paid, so you'll earn while you learn. Saskatchewan Polytechnic arranges your interviews; it's up to you to shine. It's also a chance to develop important "soft skills" in job interviewing, professional attitude, interpersonal communication and more.

Many of our co-op employers require both a valid Saskatchewan Driver's License and a clean Driver's Abstract. For international students, it can take up to 12 months to obtain a Driver's license; therefore, it is to your advantage to come with a Driver's License from your home country if possible.

Diploma to Degree

Use your Architectural Technologies diploma to ladder into the Bachelor of Construction Management right here at Saskatchewan Polytechnic or as a stepping stone to the Bachelor of Interior Design degree program at RCC Institute of Technology or the Bachelor of Technology degree program at Memorial University in Newfoundland.

Learning Environment

  • 42 students are accepted each year.
  • Students will experience studio and project work, lectures and co-operative work terms. 
  • Class hours are 8:30 a.m. - 4:30 p.m. daily. Students are expected to complete 30-40 hours of homework each week outside of class time.
  • There are many group projects that require coordination.
  • It is very important that students take initiative and manage their work time effectively.
  • Students select their specialization after successfully completing the third semester

Career and Salary Information

Your Career

Graduates are prepared for a variety of careers in the building design construction industry. Many graduates are self-employed consultants in the home building industry while others work for architects, engineers, interior designers, home designers, facility managers, developers, contractors or construction specialty companies.

For more information about career opportunities related to this program, contact Student Employment Services at the campus nearest you.

Potential Careers

Sample Job TitleNOC Classification1Earning Potential2
Construction Estimator/Project ManagerConstruction Estimators (2234)$45,800 - $115,100
Architectural/Interior DesignerArchitectural Technologists and Technicians (2251)$26,100 - $93,900
Technical Sales/Specification WriterTechnical Sales Specialists - Wholesale Trade (6221)$29,200 - $90,100

What's the Work Like?

  • Read and analyze building codes, by-laws, space requirements, site requirements and other technical documents and reports
  • Prepare manual and computer-assisted design drawings, specifications, cost estimates and listings of quantities of material from drawings and instructions
  • Build architectural and display models, and 3-D virtual models of architectural designs
  • Prepare contracts and bidding documents
  • Assist in the development of architectural designs
  • Estimate costs and materials required and may advise on leasing, real estate and marketing
  • Prepare plans and specifications for the final interior designs in accordance with current practices and codes
  • Develop detailed plans and 3-D models showing arrangement of walls, dividers, displays, lighting and other fixtures using computer-assisted design (CAD) software and graphics software
  • Develop plans, elevations, cross sections and detailed drawings, and advise on selection of colours, finishes and materials, floor and wall coverings, window treatments, interior and exterior lighting, furniture and other items,
  • supervise drafters, technicians and technologists on the architectural team
  • supervise construction projects and co-ordinate, monitor and inspect work done by others.
  • Communicate with clients to determine needs, preferences, safety requirements and purpose of space
  • direct site work crews and subcontractors.

Below is a list of skills (with examples) that are important in this line of work. This section is based on the Essential Skills Profiles developed and available through the Government of Canada.


  • Specifications manuals for building projects.
  • Emails on a variety of topics from clients, architects, engineers, designers and other technicians and technologists.
  • Building codes, zoning regulations, energy consumption regulations, by-laws and other national, provincial and municipal regulations.
  • Referring to tables included in building codes, by-laws and best practice guides to verify structural design requirements. 
  • Reviewing architectural drawings to ensure that design criteria have been satisfied and specifications have been respected.
  • Completing extensive development and building permit application forms 
  • Writing emails to co-workers, colleagues and clients to schedule or confirm meetings.
  • Writing minutes of project meetings using established formats.
  • May prepare comprehensive building specifications. These specifications comprise detailed descriptions of tasks to be performed, materials, products, accessories, standards and processes to be used, procedures for changes to contract and other contract requirements.
  • Totaling clients' bills, multiplying the numbers of hours worked on projects by hourly rates, add extra charges for courier fees and permits and calculate applicable taxes.
  • Calculating areas and volumes of complex shapes. For example, the volume of kidney-shaped swimming pool.
  • Estimating the number of project hours which should be assigned for various design tasks. 
  • Speaking with interior designers, engineering technologists and structural, mechanical, electrical and civil engineers to coordinate design and construction processes.
  • Questioning clients to identify their intentions for buildings and interior spaces, their budgets and timeframes and their aesthetic preferences and functional requirements.
  • Thinking example 1:  If an technologist experienced difficulties getting building or development permits approved they may discuss the difficulties with co-workers and consultants, review building codes, zoning regulations, by-laws and other relevant documents to ensure that architectural designs are compliant with rules and regulations.
  • Thinking example 2:  Decide which contractors to select or recommend for construction work after reviewing various tenders to determine which contractors offer the best prices and most feasible work plans. 
  • Using communication software to exchange emails and attached documents with clients, contractors and members on their design teams.
  • Using spreadsheets to track client .space and site requirements, analyze data and prepare detailed cost estimates.
  • Using computer-assisted design to prepare two-dimensional drawings and three-dimensional models of proposed architectural designs. 

Length and Start Date

Start Date(s):

September



Length: 76 weeks
There are five academic semesters and three mandatory four-month paid Co-operative Education work terms. Semesters and co-op work term time patterns are listed in Courses below.

Locations

  • Moose Jaw

Admissions

Admission Requirements

 

*Previous Saskatchewan mathematics requirement also accepted: 

  • Minimum combined average of 70% in Math A30, B30, and C30

Special Admission

Applicants who do not possess the academic qualifications for a program may be admitted if evidence of probable success can be established through a special admission assessment. Interested individuals should still apply. Applicants are automatically considered for special admission. However, some specific admission requirements may still need to be met. Refer to the ACCUPLACER© cut scores for this program below, and review additional details concerning Special Admission.

ACCUPLACER©

  • 250 Arithmetic
  • 245 Advanced Algebra and Functions
  • 258 Quantitative Reasoning, Algebra, and Statistics
  • 256 Reading
  • 250 Writing

Admission Method

First Qualified/First Admitted

The First Qualified/First Admitted (FQFA) process is used for the majority of Saskatchewan Polytechnic programs. When we determine that you meet the program's admission requirements, you will be offered admission based on the date you fully qualify for the program. The earlier you provide the appropriate documents and information that qualify you for admission to the next intake, the earlier you might begin your studies. Your application, once qualified, is always considered for the next intake. 

Applicants to programs with multiple intakes in an academic year remain in the application pool until the last intake for that academic year has begun. Programs using the FQFA process receive applications year round and maintain an application pool for each academic year. Qualified applicants who are not offered a seat must reapply for the next academic year. 

Sponsored programs or programs targeted to specific groups do not accept applications year round or maintain an application pool.

See Admission Processes for more information about this method of admission.

Tuition and Fees

Estimates are based on current rates and are subject to change. Amounts for a program may vary by campus. Totals shown here include all mandatory fees as well as approximate cost for books and supplies. Visit the Tuition and Fees web page for a complete breakdown of tuition and fees for this program.

 

2019/20 Academic Year

Year 1 - $7,880
Year 2 - $8,140
Year 3 - $2,840

The program follows this academic and co-operative education schedule. Courses are outlined below by semester.
  Sept - Dec Jan - Apr May - Aug
Year 1 Semester 1 Semester 2 Work term 1
Year 2 Semester 3 Work term 2  Semester 4
Year 3 Work term 3  Semester 5  

Semester 1

Code
Name/Description
Credits
 
CNST 122
Building Construction: Wood Frame Residential 1
4
Show course details
You will learn the fundamentals of light wood frame construction designed using Part 9 of the National Building Code of Canada. You will analyze the structural requirements of bungalows and bi-levels. You will also learn how to draw construction details using architectural drafting conventions.
Credit Units: 4
Course Hours: 60.0
Corequisites(s): CODE 100
Potential Learning Method(s): Lecture/Lab, Prior Learning
CODE 100
Building Code: Part 9 Applications 1
2
Show course details
You will learn to interpret sections of Part 9 of the National Building Code of Canada (NBC) relating to single-family dwellings. You will discuss typical construction materials and methods.
Credit Units: 2
Course Hours: 30.0
Corequisites(s): CNST 122
Potential Learning Method(s): Lecture/Lab, Online, Prior Learning
DRFT 109
Architectural Drafting: Fundamental Techniques
3
Show course details
You will study the fundamentals of architectural drafting using manual techniques. You will be introduced to architectural drafting conventions while creating multi-view and single-view drawings.
Credit Units: 3
Course Hours: 45.0
Potential Learning Method(s): Lecture/Lab, Online, Prior Learning
DRFT 110
Architectural Drafting: Computer-Aided Techniques 1
2
Show course details
You will acquire fundamental skills required to operate AutoCAD. The course focuses on architectural applications of the software.
Credit Units: 2
Course Hours: 30.0
Potential Learning Method(s): Lecture/Lab, Online, Prior Learning
DSGN 121
Design Studio: Fundamentals
4
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You will learn fundamental graphic skills and graphic design concepts. You will learn how to apply these skills to graphic presentations.
Credit Units: 4
Course Hours: 60.0
Corequisites(s):
Equivalent Course(s): GRPH 121
Potential Learning Method(s): Lecture/Lab, Online, Prior Learning
MATH 115
Calculus for Architectural Technologies
4
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You will gain knowledge of calculus topics applicable to architectural technology. You will study limits, differentiation and its applications, graphing with derivatives, and integration and its applications. This course is intended to further build problem solving and critical thinking skills, and to demonstrate the importance of calculus in engineering practice.
Credit Units: 4
Course Hours: 60.0
Equivalent Course(s): CALC 281, MAT 220, MAT 222, MAT 246
Potential Learning Method(s): Lecture/Theory, Online, Prior Learning
MGMT 228
Management Principles
3
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You will study human behaviour in organizations and develop the skills needed to deal with people at work. The course content includes individual behaviour, values, interpersonal relationships and communications, groups and team dynamics, organizational culture, leadership, and change. All topics are dealt with in the context of diverse formal organizations.
Credit Units: 3
Course Hours: 45.0
Equivalent Course(s): ADMN 220, TCOM 227
Potential Learning Method(s): Lecture/Theory, Online, Prior Learning
TCOM 102
Workplace Communication
3
Show course details
You will examine the employability skills required in the workplace. You will discuss the communication process, and practice effective interpersonal communication techniques and conflict resolution. You will use workplace writing and job search skills.
Credit Units: 3
Course Hours: 45.0
Equivalent Course(s): COMM 191, JOBS 190, JOBS 288, JOBS 290, TCOM 102CE, TCOM 120, TCOM 140, TMGT 180
Potential Learning Method(s): Learn Linc, Lecture/Theory, Online, Prior Learning

Semester 2

Code
Name/Description
Credits
 
ADMN 104
Contract Administration: Ethics, Safety and Cost Estimating
4
Show course details
You will be introduced to the roles and responsibilities of people involved in construction projects. You will consider professional ethics, liability, safety and contractual responsibility. You will learn the basic principles of cost estimating.
Credit Units: 4
Course Hours: 60.0
Equivalent Course(s): ADMN 225
Potential Learning Method(s): Lecture/Lab, Online, Prior Learning
CNST 221
Building Construction: Residential Construction 2
4
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You will expand your knowledge of light wood frame construction designed using Part 9 of the National Building Code of Canada. You will analyze the structural requirements of two-storey houses and develop the skills necessary to design and detail related construction assemblies.
Credit Units: 4
Course Hours: 60.0
Prerequisites(s): CNST 122, CODE 100
Corequisites(s):
Potential Learning Method(s): Lecture/Lab, Online, Prior Learning
CODE 101
Building Code: Part 9 Applications 2
2
Show course details
You will expand your ability to interpret sections of Part 9 of the National Building Code of Canada (NBC). You will gain proficiency in applying code concepts to all types of Part 9 buildings.
Credit Units: 2
Course Hours: 30.0
Prerequisites(s): CODE 100
Corequisites(s):
Potential Learning Method(s): Lecture/Lab, Online, Prior Learning
DRFT 111
Architectural Drafting: Computer-Aided Techniques 2
2
Show course details
You will acquire fundamental skills required to operate Autodesk Revit. You will create a partial set of working drawings for a single-family residence using fundamental procedures in Revit. This course serves as an introduction to Building Information Modelling (BIM) techniques.
Credit Units: 2
Course Hours: 30.0
Potential Learning Method(s): Lecture/Lab, Online, Prior Learning
DRFT 220
Architectural Drafting: Residential Working Drawings 1
4
Show course details
You will learn to produce architectural drawings for single-storey residential construction projects. Using AutoCAD, you will create construction drawings based on the typical requirements for residential permit sets.
Credit Units: 4
Course Hours: 60.0
Prerequisites(s): CNST 122, CODE 100, DRFT 110
Corequisites(s): CNST 221, CODE 101
Potential Learning Method(s): Lecture/Lab, Online, Prior Learning
DSGN 231
Design Studio: Residential
4
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You will learn the fundamentals of the design process. You will use that process to design a house and present your design in a professional format.
Credit Units: 4
Course Hours: 60.0
Prerequisites(s): DSGN 121
Corequisites(s):
Equivalent Course(s): GRPH 122
Potential Learning Method(s): Lecture/Lab, Online, Prior Learning
STAT 200
Statistics for Technology
2
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You will gain knowledge of statistical concepts and techniques applicable to technologies. You will study descriptive statistics, measures of central tendency and dispersion, basic probability, the Central Limit Theorem, and linear regression. This course is intended to build problem solving and critical thinking skills, and to demonstrate the importance of statistics in professional practices.
Credit Units: 2
Course Hours: 30.0
Potential Learning Method(s): Lecture/Theory, Online, Prior Learning
TCOM 103
Technical Communication
3
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You will use research skills to find technical information and cite it correctly. You will conduct effective meetings and produce supporting documents. As well, you will discuss technical report purposes and formats, write short technical reports and present technical information.
Credit Units: 3
Course Hours: 45.0
Prerequisites(s): TCOM 102 or COM 170
Equivalent Course(s): COMM 181, COMM 190, TCOM 103CE, TCOM 106, TCOM 123, TCOM 141, TCOM 190
Potential Learning Method(s): Lecture/Theory, Online, Prior Learning

Co-operative Work Term 1

Code
Name/Description
Credits
 
COOP 101
Co-operative Work Term
0
Show course details
Your co-operative education term will provide you with the opportunity to consolidate theoretical and practical concepts learned in the classroom and gain valuable experience in a work setting.
Credit Units: 0
Course Hours: 640.0
Potential Learning Method(s): Coop Education Work Term, Prior Learning

Semester 3

Code
Name/Description
Credits
 
ADMN 105
Contract Administration: Specifications and Construction Accounting
3
Show course details
You will learn the fundamentals of specifying products for construction. You will also study simple construction accounting and finance.
Credit Units: 3
Course Hours: 45.0
Equivalent Course(s): ADMN 226
Potential Learning Method(s): Lecture/Lab, Online, Prior Learning
BLDG 220
Building Systems: Preliminary Design
4
Show course details
Your studies will focus on the integration of building engineering systems. You will be introduced to mechanical, electrical, and plumbing (MEP) design principles from the perspective of architectural coordination.
Credit Units: 4
Course Hours: 60.0
Prerequisites(s): CNST 221
Corequisites(s):
Equivalent Course(s): BUSY 220
Potential Learning Method(s): Lecture/Lab, Online, Prior Learning
CNST 222
Building Construction: Commercial Fundamentals
4
Show course details
You will be introduced to materials and methods used in single-storey commercial construction. You will develop the skills necessary to design and detail basic commercial construction assemblies.
Credit Units: 4
Course Hours: 60.0
Prerequisites(s): CNST 221
Corequisites(s): CODE 200
Potential Learning Method(s): Lecture/Lab, Online, Prior Learning
CODE 200
Building Code: Part 3 Applications 1
3
Show course details
You will evaluate buildings using Part 9 and Part 3 of the National Building Code of Canada (NBC). Your analysis of buildings will include classifications, fire restrictions and exit requirements.
Credit Units: 3
Course Hours: 45.0
Prerequisites(s): CNST 221, CODE 101
Corequisites(s):
Potential Learning Method(s): Lecture/Lab, Online, Prior Learning
DRFT 224
Architectural Drafting: Residential Working Drawings 2
4
Show course details
You will produce residential working drawings using computer drafting software, based on preliminary design data, manufacturers' literature and the National Building Code of Canada (NBC). Your focus will be on a custom-designed, two-storey house.
Credit Units: 4
Course Hours: 60.0
Prerequisites(s): CNST 221, CODE 101, DRFT 220
Corequisites(s):
Potential Learning Method(s): Lecture/Lab, Online, Prior Learning
DSGN 232
Design Studio: Institutional
4
Show course details
You will use the design process to plan and design an institutional project that meets specialized client needs. You will present and critique your design in a professional setting.
Credit Units: 4
Course Hours: 60.0
Prerequisites(s): DSGN 231
Corequisites(s):
Equivalent Course(s): GRPH 220
Potential Learning Method(s): Lecture/Lab, Online, Prior Learning
PHYS 228
Physics: Light, Heat and Sound
3
Show course details
Your studies will focus on the fundamental principles of dynamics, light and illumination, electrical generation and distribution, heat production and transfer, fluid flow, vibration, waves and sound. The basic principles of physics in each of these areas will be studied in the context of building systems applications.
Credit Units: 3
Course Hours: 45.0
Potential Learning Method(s): Lecture/Theory, Online, Prior Learning

Co-operative Work Term 2

Code
Name/Description
Credits
 
COOP 201
Co-operative Work Term
0
Show course details
Your second co-operative education term will build on the experience gained during your first work placement and provide you with additional opportunities to develop skills and techniques related to your field of studies in a real work setting.
Credit Units: 0
Course Hours: 640.0
Potential Learning Method(s): Coop Education Work Term, Prior Learning

Semester 4 (Building Sciences)

Code
Name/Description
Credits
 
BLDG 222
Building Systems: Building Science
3
Show course details
You will examine the effects of heat, vapour, and air flow in building enclosures. You will also examine the effect of climate and weather on building enclosures. You will consider ways to successfully design building assemblies and connections using building science principles.
Credit Units: 3
Course Hours: 45.0
Prerequisites(s): BLDG 220, CNST 222
Equivalent Course(s): LAND 220
Potential Learning Method(s): Lecture/Lab, Online, Prior Learning
CNST 232
Building Construction: Commercial Buildings 1
4
Show course details
You will be introduced to materials and methods used in low-rise commercial construction. You will develop the skills necessary to design and detail commercial construction assemblies that integrate structural frames.
Credit Units: 4
Course Hours: 60.0
Prerequisites(s): CNST 222, CODE 200
Corequisites(s):
Equivalent Course(s): CNST 223
Potential Learning Method(s): Lecture/Lab, Online, Prior Learning
CODE 201
Building Code: Part 3 Applications 2
2
Show course details
You will continue to assess buildings using Part 9 and Part 3 of the National Building Code of Canada (NBC). Your will complete a code review for a Part 9 renovation. You will also interpret means of egress, fire and sound ratings, and universal design criteria in Part 3 buildings.
Credit Units: 2
Course Hours: 30.0
Prerequisites(s): CNST 222, CODE 200
Potential Learning Method(s): Lecture/Lab, Online, Prior Learning
DRFT 210
Architectural Drafting: Computer-Aided Techniques 3
1
Show course details
You will expand your skills using Revit for architectural application. You will use the software to create architectural drawings commonly found in commercial sets. This course allows you to practice your Building Information Modelling (BIM) skills.
Credit Units: 1
Course Hours: 15.0
Prerequisites(s): DRFT 224
Potential Learning Method(s): Lecture/Lab, Online, Prior Learning
HIST 221
Architectural History: Context for Saskatchewan
3
Show course details
Your studies will focus on a survey of art, culture and architecture in indigenous, classical, medieval, renaissance and modern societies. You will gain an understanding of the relationship between architecture and social values, and the influence of early precedents on later design. You will also examine Saskatchewan's architectural heritage and analyze case studies in building preservation, restoration and rehabilitation.
Credit Units: 3
Course Hours: 45.0
Equivalent Course(s): HIST 220
Potential Learning Method(s): Lecture/Lab, Online, Prior Learning
PHYS 227
Physics: Statics and Strength of Materials
3
Show course details
Your studies will focus on the basic principles of statics (including the concepts of vectors, forces and equilibrium in two dimensions) and properties of materials (including stress and strain, elasticity and other mechanical properties). The course concludes with a study of centroids and moments of inertia of cross-sections of structural members.
Credit Units: 3
Course Hours: 45.0
Equivalent Course(s): SCAL 122
Potential Learning Method(s): Lecture/Theory, Online, Prior Learning
RENO 220
Architectural Drafting: Renovation Working Drawings
4
Show course details
As part of a team, you will create architectural drawings for a house renovation. You will also study construction systems of the past to inform your design and drafting decisions.
Credit Units: 4
Course Hours: 60.0
Prerequisites(s): DRFT 224
Equivalent Course(s): DRFT 231, DRFT 252
Potential Learning Method(s): Lecture/Lab, Online, Prior Learning
SRVY 228
Surveying: Introduction to Survey and Building Layout
3
Show course details
You will receive an introduction to the basics of surveying. The course content includes horizontal measurements, levelling, angle and direction measurement, computations.
Credit Units: 3
Course Hours: 45.0
Equivalent Course(s): SRVY 120
Potential Learning Method(s): Lecture/Lab, Online, Prior Learning

Semester 4 (Interior Design)

Code
Name/Description
Credits
 
CNST 233
Building Construction: Commercial Interiors
3
Show course details
Your studies will focus on materials and construction methods used in commercial interior design. You will develop the skills necessary to design and detail interior construction assemblies. Architectural Woodwork Manufacturers Association of Canada (AWMAC) standards will be examined as part of your studies.
Credit Units: 3
Course Hours: 45.0
Prerequisites(s): CNST 222, CODE 200
Corequisites(s):
Potential Learning Method(s): Lecture/Lab, Online, Prior Learning
CODE 201
Building Code: Part 3 Applications 2
2
Show course details
You will continue to assess buildings using Part 9 and Part 3 of the National Building Code of Canada (NBC). Your will complete a code review for a Part 9 renovation. You will also interpret means of egress, fire and sound ratings, and universal design criteria in Part 3 buildings.
Credit Units: 2
Course Hours: 30.0
Prerequisites(s): CNST 222, CODE 200
Potential Learning Method(s): Lecture/Lab, Online, Prior Learning
DRFT 210
Architectural Drafting: Computer-Aided Techniques 3
1
Show course details
You will expand your skills using Revit for architectural application. You will use the software to create architectural drawings commonly found in commercial sets. This course allows you to practice your Building Information Modelling (BIM) skills.
Credit Units: 1
Course Hours: 15.0
Prerequisites(s): DRFT 224
Potential Learning Method(s): Lecture/Lab, Online, Prior Learning
DSGN 234
Design Studio: Commercial Mixed Occupancy 1
4
Show course details
You will develop the programme and concept for a commercial mixed-occupancy interior. You will also visually communicate design ideas while advancing your presentation skills. You will use manual techniques and digital imaging software to enhance presentations, create graphic layouts and exploit multiple types of media.
Credit Units: 4
Course Hours: 60.0
Prerequisites(s): DRFT 224, DSGN 232, CODE 200
Corequisites(s): CODE 201
Potential Learning Method(s): Lecture/Lab, Online, Prior Learning
HIST 221
Architectural History: Context for Saskatchewan
3
Show course details
Your studies will focus on a survey of art, culture and architecture in indigenous, classical, medieval, renaissance and modern societies. You will gain an understanding of the relationship between architecture and social values, and the influence of early precedents on later design. You will also examine Saskatchewan's architectural heritage and analyze case studies in building preservation, restoration and rehabilitation.
Credit Units: 3
Course Hours: 45.0
Equivalent Course(s): HIST 220
Potential Learning Method(s): Lecture/Lab, Online, Prior Learning
PHYS 227
Physics: Statics and Strength of Materials
3
Show course details
Your studies will focus on the basic principles of statics (including the concepts of vectors, forces and equilibrium in two dimensions) and properties of materials (including stress and strain, elasticity and other mechanical properties). The course concludes with a study of centroids and moments of inertia of cross-sections of structural members.
Credit Units: 3
Course Hours: 45.0
Equivalent Course(s): SCAL 122
Potential Learning Method(s): Lecture/Theory, Online, Prior Learning
RENO 222
Design Studio: Commercial Adaptive Re-use
4
Show course details
You will create architectural drawings to adapt an existing house into a commercial space. You will also study construction systems of the past to inform your design and drafting decisions.
Credit Units: 4
Course Hours: 60.0
Prerequisites(s): DRFT 224
Corequisites(s): CODE 201
Equivalent Course(s): DSGN 233
Potential Learning Method(s): Lecture/Lab, Online, Prior Learning
SRVY 228
Surveying: Introduction to Survey and Building Layout
3
Show course details
You will receive an introduction to the basics of surveying. The course content includes horizontal measurements, levelling, angle and direction measurement, computations.
Credit Units: 3
Course Hours: 45.0
Equivalent Course(s): SRVY 120
Potential Learning Method(s): Lecture/Lab, Online, Prior Learning

Co-operative Work Term 3

Code
Name/Description
Credits
 
COOP 301
Co-operative Work Term
0
Show course details
Your third co-operative education work term will round out the work term experience by adding related work knowledge through the application of theories and practices relevant to your field of studies.
Credit Units: 0
Course Hours: 640.0
Potential Learning Method(s): Coop Education Work Term, Prior Learning

Semester 5 (Building Sciences)

Code
Name/Description
Credits
 
ADMN 258
Project Management and Estimating
3
Show course details
You will be introduced to estimating and control concepts within construction project management. You will practice your skills by using project management software and spreadsheets. The course focuses on all aspects of a project, from its initiation to its close out. You will use your skills to plan a construction project.
Credit Units: 3
Course Hours: 45.0
Prerequisites(s): ADMN 105, PROJ 228(concurrent)
Corequisites(s):
Potential Learning Method(s): Lecture/Lab, Online, Prior Learning
BLDG 221
Building Systems: Commercial Buildings
4
Show course details
You will explore the preliminary design and integration of building engineering systems commonly used in large buildings. Your studies will include analysis of energy use. You will learn to prepare preliminary layouts of mechanical, electrical, and plumbing (MEP) equipment.
Credit Units: 4
Course Hours: 60.0
Prerequisites(s): BLDG 220, BLDG 222
Corequisites(s):
Equivalent Course(s): BUSY 222
Potential Learning Method(s): Lecture/Lab, Online, Prior Learning
CNST 224
Building Construction: Commercial Buildings 2
4
Show course details
You will be introduced to materials and methods used in multi-storey commercial construction. You will develop the skills necessary to design and detail commercial construction assemblies to withstand the stresses of building movement.
Credit Units: 4
Course Hours: 60.0
Prerequisites(s): CNST 232
Corequisites(s):
Potential Learning Method(s): Lecture/Lab, Online, Prior Learning
CODE 300
Building Code: Part 3 Applications 3
2
Show course details
You will assess specific construction scenarios by interpreting all relevant parts of the National Building Code of Canada (NBC). You will focus on establishing construction criteria for Part 3 buildings.
Credit Units: 2
Course Hours: 30.0
Prerequisites(s): CODE 201
Potential Learning Method(s): Lecture/Lab, Online, Prior Learning
DRFT 233
Architectural Drafting: Commercial Working Drawings
4
Show course details
You will produce a partial set of working drawings for a commercial building using Revit. Your drawings will be based on preliminary design data, manufacturers' literature and the National Building Code of Canada (NBC).
Credit Units: 4
Course Hours: 60.0
Prerequisites(s): CNST 232, CODE 201, DRFT 210
Potential Learning Method(s): Lecture/Lab, Online, Prior Learning
PROJ 228
Applied Research: Capstone Project
4
Show course details
You will use the technical problem-solving process, advanced research skills, and knowledge acquired in previous courses to complete an applied research project. You will present and defend your unique solution to an architectural design problem in a written report and oral presentation.
Credit Units: 4
Course Hours: 60.0
Prerequisites(s): ADMN 104, ADMN 105, BLDG 220, (CNST 232 or CNST 233), CODE 201, DRFT 210, DSGN 232, PHYS 227, PHYS 228, SRVY 228, TCOM 102, TCOM 103, (BLDG 221(concurrent), DRFT 233(concurrent)) or (BLDG 250(concurrent), DRFT 234(concurrent))
Potential Learning Method(s): Lecture/Lab, Online, Prior Learning
STRU 240
Structural Design: Structural Steel
4
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You will learn how to do a preliminary design of steel structures as used in commercial buildings. You will use the Handbook of Steel Construction and Part 4 of the National Building Code of Canada to complete a preliminary design of a low-rise building. Your studies will also include and introduction to wood and steel structural design.
Credit Units: 4
Course Hours: 60.0
Prerequisites(s): PHYS 227
Corequisites(s):
Potential Learning Method(s): Lecture/Lab, Online, Prior Learning

Semester 5 (Interior Design)

Code
Name/Description
Credits
 
ADMN 258
Project Management and Estimating
3
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You will be introduced to estimating and control concepts within construction project management. You will practice your skills by using project management software and spreadsheets. The course focuses on all aspects of a project, from its initiation to its close out. You will use your skills to plan a construction project.
Credit Units: 3
Course Hours: 45.0
Prerequisites(s): ADMN 105, PROJ 228(concurrent)
Corequisites(s):
Potential Learning Method(s): Lecture/Lab, Online, Prior Learning
BLDG 250
Building Systems: Commercial Interiors
4
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You will explore the preliminary design and integration of building engineering systems that affect interior spaces in large buildings. You will learn to prepare preliminary layouts of lighting, electrical, signaling, fire suppression, way-finding, and systems ceilings, flooring and furniture.
Credit Units: 4
Course Hours: 60.0
Prerequisites(s): BLDG 220
Corequisites(s):
Potential Learning Method(s): Lecture/Lab, Online, Prior Learning
CNST 234
Building Construction: Furniture Construction
4
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You will explore the complexities of the design-build process by creating a piece of furniture. You will design, document, construct, and present your furniture piece. Upon completion of this project, you will evaluate the implementation of the design intentions.
Credit Units: 4
Course Hours: 60.0
Prerequisites(s): CNST 233
Corequisites(s):
Potential Learning Method(s): Lecture/Lab, Online, Prior Learning
CODE 300
Building Code: Part 3 Applications 3
2
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You will assess specific construction scenarios by interpreting all relevant parts of the National Building Code of Canada (NBC). You will focus on establishing construction criteria for Part 3 buildings.
Credit Units: 2
Course Hours: 30.0
Prerequisites(s): CODE 201
Potential Learning Method(s): Lecture/Lab, Online, Prior Learning
DRFT 234
Architectural Drafting: Commercial Working Drawings
4
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You will produce a partial set of working drawings for a commercial building using Revit. Your drawings will be based on preliminary design, design data, manufacturers' literature and the National Building Code of Canada (NBC).
Credit Units: 4
Course Hours: 60.0
Prerequisites(s): CODE 201, DRFT 210, DSGN 234
Corequisites(s): CODE 300
Potential Learning Method(s): Lecture/Lab, Online, Prior Learning
DSGN 235
Design Studio: Commercial Mixed Occupancy 2
4
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You will fully develop a final design proposal for a commercial mixed-occupancy interior, based on your preliminary design. You will prepare and present the proposal in a professional setting.
Credit Units: 4
Course Hours: 60.0
Prerequisites(s): CODE 201, DSGN 234
Corequisites(s): DRFT 234
Potential Learning Method(s): Lecture/Lab, Online, Prior Learning
PROJ 228
Applied Research: Capstone Project
4
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You will use the technical problem-solving process, advanced research skills, and knowledge acquired in previous courses to complete an applied research project. You will present and defend your unique solution to an architectural design problem in a written report and oral presentation.
Credit Units: 4
Course Hours: 60.0
Prerequisites(s): ADMN 104, ADMN 105, BLDG 220, (CNST 232 or CNST 233), CODE 201, DRFT 210, DSGN 232, PHYS 227, PHYS 228, SRVY 228, TCOM 102, TCOM 103, (BLDG 221(concurrent), DRFT 233(concurrent)) or (BLDG 250(concurrent), DRFT 234(concurrent))
Potential Learning Method(s): Lecture/Lab, Online, Prior Learning

Get Credit for What You Know

Prior Learning Assessment and Recognition

Saskatchewan Polytechnic recognizes that adults learn in many different ways. This includes acquiring knowledge and skills through life and work experience or non-formal training.See links below to more information about PLAR and detailed PLAR candidate guides for the Arts and Sciences courses in this program. To discuss PLAR for other courses in this program, contact us at 1-866-467-4278 and ask for the Program Head of this program.


Transfer Credit

Many Sask Polytech students benefit from transferring course credit. You may be eligible to transfer credit to Sask Polytech or to another college or university.


Transfer credit options vary over time; this information is subject to change. Transfer credit options for this program include:

potential transfer credit toward Bachelor and Master's degrees in interior design, architecture and construction management.
Graduates of this program may be eligible to receive 30 block credits and 3 credits each for ENGL 255, COMP 210, ARCH 200 and APST 230 for a total of 42 credit units toward a Bachelor of Science-Architecture Post Diploma.
Graduates of this program may be eligible for block transfer into Bachelor of Technology Degree with 39 credit hours (13 courses) to be completed, including a technical project and report
Graduates of this program may be accepted into and may receive up to 81 transfer credits in the Bachelor of Interior Design degree program.
Graduates of this program (Interior Technologies major) may receive up to 84 transfer credits (2018 Sask Polytech curriculum) or up to 81 transfer credits (2016 Sask Polytech curriculum) in the Bachelor Interior Design degree program.

Student Awards

Thanks to the generosity of donors and alumni, Saskatchewan Polytechnic gives away more than $2 million in student awards during the academic year.

Saskatchewan Polytechnic offers student awards for every certificate and diploma program at every campus. Not all student awards are based on marks - some are based on financial need or things like community or volunteer involvement.

More about scholarships

Accreditation

American Council for Construction Education (ACCE); Technologies Accreditation Canada (TAC)

The Canadian Council of Technicians and Technologists’ (CCTT) Canadian Technology Accreditation Board (CTAB) accredits the program at the Technologist level. The American Council for Construction Education (ACCE) also accredits the program as an International Associate Degree Program.

The educational unit shall demonstrate accountable behavior by providing information about its accredited degree programs to the general public.

Institutions shall broadly and accurately publish the objectives of the degree program, admission requirements, degree program assessment measures employed, the information obtained through these assessment measures and actions taken as a result of the feedback, student achievement, the rate and types of employment of graduates and any data supporting the qualitative claims made by the degree program.

Program Objectives, Assessment and Quality Improvement Plan

Mission Statement

The Architectural Technologies program provides students with the highest quality preparation for employment and leadership in all aspects of Saskatchewan’s building design and construction industry.

Goals

We endeavour to become…

  • the school of first choice for premier high school graduates and highly motivated university transfers.
  • a program that challenges students to discover abilities and performance levels beyond their expectations.
  • industry’s first choice for hiring students and grads.

We endeavour to provide…

  • complete preparation to work in all aspects of residential design and construction.
  • a comprehensive general introduction to all aspects of design and construction for commercial building types.
  • the highest level of architectural drafting skills.
  • specialized knowledge in residential, commercial and institutional building code, construction detailing and project management.
  • leadership in sustainable construction practices.

Measurable Objectives

  • Program Design: documented learning outcomes validated by industry.
  • Student Evaluation: valid assessment of each student and learning outcome
  • Program Delivery: active learning on the part of students.
  • Student Intake: a full complement of new students each September.
  • Student Progression: a high rate of student retention each semester.
  • Learning Resources: a rich diversity of learning activities and resources.
  • Student Support: students are able to make informed and intelligent decisions.
  • Employment: full training-related co-op and graduate employment.
  • Industry Relations: program grads become successful employers.

American Council for Construction Education-Student Learning Outcomes

Upon graduation from this ACCE Accredited program, a graduate shall be able to:
1. Demonstrate effective communication, both orally and in writing.
2. Demonstrate the ability to estimate quantities and costs for the bidding process in a construction project.
3. Demonstrate the ability to schedule a basic construction project.
4. Demonstrate the ability to use current technology related to the construction process.
5. Interpret construction documents (contracts, specifications, and drawings) used in managing a construction project.
6. Apply basic principles of construction accounting.
7. Use basic surveying techniques used in building layout.
8. Discuss basic principles of ethics in the construction industry.
9. Identify the fundamentals of contracts, codes, and regulations that govern a construction project.
10. Recognize basic construction methods, materials and equipment.
11. Recognize basic safety hazards on a construction site and standard prevention measures.
12. Recognize the basic principles of structural design.
13. Recognize the basic principles of mechanical, electrical and piping systems.

In addition, upon graduation from this program, a graduate shall also be able to:
14. Design NBC Part 9 residential buildings
15. Participate in the design of NBC Part 3 commercial buildings.

Technology Accreditation Canada- General Outcomes

Upon Graduation from this TAC Accredited program, a graduate shall be able to:

  • GC01 Technology Report: Research, analyze, prepare, document, submit, and defend a Technology Report (Capstone Project) relating to a significant technology-related issue.
  • GC02 Mathematics: Resolve engineering technology/applied science problems applying algebra, matrix manipulation and introductory calculus.
  • GC03 Project Management: Apply the current practices of project management to applied science and engineering technology projects consistent with the discipline requirements.
  • GC04 Physical and Natural Sciences: Resolve technical problems applying the principles of physical and natural science.
  • GC05 Ethics, Sustainability, Contracts, and Codes: Resolve engineering technology and applied science problems applying business/management principles, ethics, sustainability, contract law, codes and standards.
  • GC06 Communications: Analyze, access and document data preparing charts and reports and present to stakeholders.
  • GC07 Computer Knowledge: Use a variety of appropriate computer hardware and software necessary to the performance of tasks within the discipline.
  • GC08 Health and Safety: Health and Safety Standards, to minimize exposure to unsafe conditions and ensure a safe working environment for oneself and co-workers.


Technology Accreditation Canada- Program Discipline Outcomes

Upon Graduation from this TAC Accredited program, a graduate shall be able to:

  • ARCTY01 Architectural Drawings: Create compete sets of architectural drawings for residential/commercial construction/renovation projects.
  • ARCTY02 Building Design: Apply basic architectural principles in building design or detailing. Interior Design Option Only.
  • ARCTY05 Building Science: Assess, design and detail construction projects applying principles of building science and construction engineering. Building Science option only.
  • ARCTY09 Codes, Bylaws and Regulations: Interpret and apply applicable codes, bylaws and regulations.
  • ARCTY10 Renovation/Restoration: Evaluate existing buildings and prepare renovation/restoration proposals.
  • ARCTY13 Project Management: Plan, schedule and monitor architectural and construction projects.

Average number of applicants over the past five years: 90

Program capacity in first semester: 42

We recommend that prospective students apply in the fall of their final year of high school. Please verify admission requirements with the registration office.

The primary purpose of program review is to ensure that Saskatchewan Polytechnic programs reflect current and emerging practices in business and industry. The program review process examines the viability and sustainability of programs in fostering the skills, knowledge, and practices to meet the needs of business and industry and the provincial economy. View the complete program review policy.


Annual Program Assessment: Accountability
The annual program assessment review will use summary data gathered by Institutional Research and Analysis (IR&A) and IR&A will be prepared annually for base programs. IR&A will prepare a program summary review report based on the key factors and performance indicators that have readily available quantifiable data. This report will include an assessment of the program's results based on the benchmark for each performance indicator. The data are primarily a numerical consolidation of annual program metrics including:

  • application trends
  • enrolment trends
  • graduate trends
  • withdrawal trends and main reasons
  • equity participation rates
  • graduation and withdrawal rates by cohort


The report will also contain results from the most recent graduate employment and student surveys, including:

  • graduate employment rates
  • student satisfaction
  • graduate satisfaction
  • market demand for graduates

The annual program assessment will be provided to the Provost and Vice President Academic, deans and program head/chairs. The program head/chairs and division deans will meet to discuss program performance using the data to inform future planning. The discussion will also include any feedback from program advisory committee meetings.

Annual Program Assessment Support: Program Vitality Index Decision Making Matrix
The annual program assessment will be complemented by an examination of critical criteria from the institutional Program Vitality Index Decision Making Matrix/Rubric. The program vitality index provides information that facilitates determining the viability of program offerings and in developing program performance measures. IR&A will prepare an annual report which scores each program on four (4) critical criteria that focus on the demonstration of a critical mass of students, appropriate graduation rates and evidence of sufficient employment opportunities:

  • number of qualified applicants to capacity
  • number of enrolments to capacity
  • graduate employment rate in training-related occupation (within 6 months of graduation)
  • graduates (per cohort)


Programs are expected to score 60% or greater to be deemed viable and not require further examination. Programs scoring less than 60% will undergo further examination using established secondary criteria. The Program Vitality Index Decision Making Matrix/Rubric report for each program will be provided annually to the Provost and Vice President Academic and division deans who will provide results and discuss the outcomes and future program direction with their program head/chairs.

Program Review Sustainability
The program review will occur for all base programs and will consist of the Saskatchewan Polytechnic education framework analysis, including a gap analysis. The Saskatchewan Polytechnic education framework analysis will examine the following key areas:

  • program design
  • student evaluation
  • program delivery
  • student intakes
  • student progression
  • learning activities and resources
  • student support

Participation in the education framework gap analysis will include the school's program development consultant, program head/chair and the dean or associate dean as well as program faculty as needed. The review will identify strengths and opportunities for improvement in each of the key areas and will outline a plan to meet any deficiencies. Following each education framework review, results will be discussed with the program advisory committee or trade board. Results of the program review will be acted upon as per the Academic Authorities' Grid.

External Accreditation and Program Approval
Many programs are accredited by an external agency or approved by a professional association. Accreditation and professional association approval usually provides a comprehensive examination of curriculum and other key program components and elements based on approved up-to-date fixed standards. Preparation for accreditation or approval is the responsibility of the program and will be conducted per accrediting body timelines. Accredited and approved programs may also choose to have optional research done. This will supplement the accreditation or approval findings by providing information in any areas that the accreditation or approval process did not cover.

External Processes

  • The Architectural Technologies program is accredited by the Technology Accreditation Canada (TAC). The most recent accreditation site visit was in 2018.
  • The Architectural Technologies program is accredited by the American Council for Construction Education (ACCE). The program was reaccredited for the 2015-2021 period.
  • The Architectural Technologies program has articulation agreements with Athabasca University (Architecture) and Yorkville University (Interior Design).
  • Graduates routinely receive transfer credit to the architectural degree program at Montana State University and the Syllabus Program of the Royal Architectural Institute of Canada.


Internal Processes

  • The Architectural Technologies program is subject to the same continuous internal reviews and program vitality studies as all other programs. This has included employer focus groups and curriculum validations.
  • In addition, the Industry Advisory Committee reviews the program annually.
  • School policy requires that each program must be reviewed every six years. A formal review of the Architectural Technologies program was conducted in July 2014, including student, graduate and employer surveys.
  • This was followed by a GAP Analysis in August 2015 and Advisory Committee recommendations in September 2015, leading to adoption of the New Curriculum Model in fall 2017.

ESSENTIAL ELEMENT 1. PROGRAM DESIGN

  • Information Obtained: Some English-Second-Language students have difficulty keeping up with lectures.
  • Actions Resulting: (2016) Will recommend to Dean that a bridging program be created to teach construction terminology to ESL applicants.
  • Actions Resulting: (2017) Saskatchewan Polytechnic has created the position of Intercultural Services Language Instructor to assist ESL students.
  • Actions Resulting: (2018) As Saskatchewan Polytechnic deals with this at the institute level, this matter is considered closed.

ESSENTIAL ELEMENT 2. STUDENT EVALUATION

  • Information Obtained: Assessment documents have not been completed. This is useful for standardized marking, student information and succession planning.
  • Actions Resulting: (2016) All assessment documents will be completed as part of the new academic model.
  • Actions Resulting: (2017) Aligned with new academic model. Syllabi, rubrics, and online gradebooks are being phased in and included on Brightspace. Online gradebooks being phased in.
  • Actions Resulting: (2018) We continue to build the data base on Brightspace. Brightspace is now used to provide course information, rubrics and feedback to students.
  • Information Obtained: Students not well informed about how they will be evaluated.
  • Actions Resulting: (2016) All syllabi now show percentage breakdown of grades within one year. Rubrics to be prepared for all assignments.
  • Actions Resulting: (2017) All syllabi now show percentage breakdown of grades. Rubrics and online gradebooks are being phased in and included on Brightspace.
  • Actions Resulting: (2018) Brightspace is now used to provide course information, rubrics and feedback to students. Students have responded positively.
  • Information Obtained: There is no mechanism for partial students to pick up out-of-sequence courses.
  • Actions Resulting: (2016) Extension courses have been created to permit out-of-sequence instruction/evaluation.
  • Actions Resulting: (2018) This is an ongoing matter. Certain courses may be made available as part of the Bachelor degree program.
  • Information Obtained: Instructors don't always provide timely feedback.
  • Actions Resulting: (2016) New rubrics and web-based assessment have improved both timeliness and quality.
  • Actions Resulting: (2016) Use more learner-to-learner feedback in classroom.
  • Actions Resulting: (2016) Increased formative feedback at intermediate stages.
  • Actions Resulting: (2017) Online grading has been fully developed for PROJ 228 and is being phased in for other courses. For assignments, the goal will be to return marked work within five working days. For large projects, timelines may be longer.
  • Actions Resulting: (2018) Online grading has been extended to most courses.
  • Information Obtained: Students perceive a shortage of computers.
  • Actions Resulting: (2016) More computers have been installed.
  • Actions Resulting: (2017) Instruction in computer lab has been reduced. Computers now available during certain assigned tutorial classes.
  • Information Obtained: (2017) Perceived shortage of computers persists but degree of concern has been reduced.
  • Actions Resulting: (2018) This matter is considered closed, but the situation is being monitored.

CUSTOMIZED ELEMENT 3. PROGRAM DELIVERY

  • Information Obtained: Course information is inconsistent.
  • Actions Resulting: (2016) We now use standardized course management software in all courses.
  • Actions Resulting: (2017) Staff and students have responded well to Brightspace.
  • Actions Resulting: (2018) Information on Brightspace is improved with each course offering.
  • Information Obtained: Part-time instructors do not provide consistent documentation.
  • Actions Resulting: (2016) New assessment documents, rubrics and course management software will be made available to part-time staff.
  • Actions Resulting: (2016) Faculty Certificate training will be recommended for part-time staff.
  • Actions Resulting: (2017) Part-time faculty will take New Instructor Orientation training as offered by Instructional and Leadership Development (ILDC)
  • Actions Resulting: (2018) Part-time staff are adapting to use of Brightspace.


CUSTOMIZED ELEMENT 4. STUDENT INTAKES

  • Information Obtained: Students drop off waiting list.
  • Actions Resulting: (2016) Meet with accepted students 3 months prior to first semester.
  • Actions Resulting: (2016) Increase participation in high school career fairs.
  • Actions Resulting: (2017) Accept more students than program capacity.
  • Information Obtained: (2017) Program is full. Wait list is longer.
  • Information Obtained: (2018) Students on wait list wait a full year rather than fill empty seats.


CUSTOMIZED ELEMENT 5. STUDENT PROGRESSION

  • Information Obtained: Student workload is an issue.
  • Actions Resulting: All courses have been reviewed to remove redundant work.
  • Information Obtained: (2017) Fewer students consider workload an issue.
  • Actions Resulting: This matter is considered closed. We are however monitoring effect of new supplemental policy.


CUSTOMIZED ELEMENT 6. LEARNING ACTIVITIES AND RESOURCES

  • Information Obtained: Lab and study space for unstructured time is limited.
  • Actions Resulting: (2016) Will try to provide more access to computers.
  • Actions Resulting: (2017) Instruction in computer lab has been reduced. Computers now available during certain assigned tutorial classes.
  • Information Obtained: (2018) Perceived shortage of computers persists but degree of concern has been reduced.
  • Actions Resulting: (2018) New furniture has been ordered for computer lab.
  • Information Obtained: Purchased text books are not all "needed.
  • Actions Resulting: (2016) Will ask instructors to consider "recommended" texts and e-books.
  • Actions Resulting: (2017) Some instructors using custom textbooks from publisher.
  • Actions Resulting: (2018) Some material available on line. Will need to monitor situation.


SUPPORTIVE ELEMENT 7. STUDENT SUPPORT

  • Information Obtained: Some students are unprepared for the workload and time commitment.
  • Actions Resulting: (2016) Mandatory classroom time has be reduced. More personal tutorial time has been introduced.
  • Information Obtained: (2017) Fewer students consider workload an issue
  • Actions Resulting: (2018) This matter is considered closed.


SUPPORTIVE ELEMENT 8. EMPLOYMENT

  • Information Obtained: No current issues.
  • Actions Resulting: None.


SUPPORTIVE ELEMENT 9. INDUSTRY RELATIONS

  • Information Obtained: Under-utilization of alumni as a resource.
  • Actions Resulting: (2016) Will try to develop social network.
  • Actions Resulting: (2017) Need to involve graduates in routine focus groups and fundraising for specific activities.
  • Actions Resulting: (2018) Alumni association is being formed.

 

 

Student Awards
Students in the Architectural Technologies program have recently won Academic Achievement and Centennial Merit awards for overall average as well as specific awards for achievement in individual courses.

The Saskatchewan Association of Architects, the Interior Designers Association of Saskatchewan, Construction Specifications Canada, and the Saskatchewan Applied Science Technologists and Technicians all offer student awards.

Skills Canada
The Skills Canada National Competition (SCNC) is the only national, multi-trade and technology competition for students and apprentices in the country.

Every year, more than 500 young people from all regions of Canada come to SCNC to participate in over 40 skilled trade and technology contests.

Each year, the Architectural Technologies program sends a graduate to compete at the national competition. Competing against the best representatives from all across Canada, we routinely do better than any other school, winning a medal every year, usually a gold medal, since 2000.

Applied Research Awards
The Architectural Technologies program often participates in applied research with industry partners. The Architectural Technologies program has won five awards from the Regional Centre of Expertise on Education for Sustainable Development for a series of small projects including studies of a green roof, community gardens, 100-mile house and a project in Thailand which involved students travelling to Thailand to build a school using local-sustainable materials.

In addition, the program won a federal NSERC grant for a study of energy consumption in commercial buildings.

Co-operative Employment Program

All students are required to work three paid work terms with local employers. When a graduate seeks employment, they are looking for their fourth job, not their first. Typically, the construction industry has been doing well and we have placed all students each semester.

During temporary economic downturns pertaining to resource prices, it sometimes takes longer to find employment. Our students and graduates have an edge over those without formal construction education.
Typical co-op employment over three semesters.

  • Architectural firms (19)
  • Construction companies (21)
  • Residential and homebuilders (9)
  • Provincial government (17)
  • Engineering companies (6)
  • Federal government (2)
  • Project management (2)
  • Other (9)

In Regina: 37 placements
In Saskatoon: 35 placements
Other locations: 13 placements

Graduate Employment
In recent years all graduates seeking employment have been employed in the building industry. Many return to a previous co-op employer. Others seek new opportunities. Some continue with their education.
Graduates may be employed in design offices, by homebuilders, by heavy construction companies, by property managers and by construction material suppliers.

Self-Employment
It is not unusual for a graduate with a few years' experience to open their own design or construction management firm, usually in the residential sector.

There is no better way to assess the program than to speak with former grads who now work in the construction industry. Contact the program and you will be put in touch with several grads.

Aggregate data is available on the school web site. Program specific data may be obtained from the Dean's office.

Saskatchewan Polytechnic routinely surveys students, graduates and employers. These are incorporated in the formal internal quality assessment process. Following are some recent (2016-17) survey results:

Students (percentage agreeing with the statement)

  • Overall, I am satisfied with this program. 100%
  • I would recommend this program to others. 80%
  • Scope of program is well explained. 90%
  • The instructors treat students with respect. 100%
  • Satisfied with quality of instruction. 80%
  • Students are informed of how they will be evaluated. 85%
  • Student assessments focused on what was learned. 100%
  • The amount of hands-on experience is adequate. 90%
  • Student learning activities are effectively scheduled. 90%
  • The student workload is manageable. 65%
  • The shop/lab facilities are appropriate. 90%


Graduates (percentage agreeing with the statement)

  • Overall, I am satisfied with this program. 91%
  • I would recommend this program to others. 95%
  • The instructors treat students with respect. 95%
  • Students are informed of how they will be evaluated. 78%
  • Student assessments focused on what was learned. 91%
  • The amount of hands-on experience is adequate. 91%
  • Student learning activities are effectively scheduled. 55%
  • The student workload is manageable. 50%
  • The shop/lab facilities are appropriate. 82%


Employers of recent graduates (percentage agreeing with the statement)

  • Preparation for employment is adequate. 100%
  • Graduate has job related knowledge. 100%
  • Satisfaction with skills of graduate. 100%
  •  Would hire a Sask Polytech grad in the future. 100%

 

Additional Information

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