Menu

Medical Radiologic Technology

Diploma
Medical Radiologic Technology

Program Overview

If you’re considering a career in health – one that lets you work one-on-one with people and use state-of-the-art medical equipment – Saskatchewan Polytechnic’s Medical Radiologic Technology program might be for you.

Radiological technologists produce images of body parts and systems using X-ray, computed tomography (CT) and breast imaging equipment. You need to be diligent, detail-oriented and committed to high work standards. You also need to be comfortable positioning and touching patients, as well as talking with them.

Note

This program is subject to the high-demand admission process. It is open for application from 8:00 a.m., October 1, to 4:30 p.m., February 15 (Saskatchewan times), each academic year. All supporting documentation is required by 4:30 p.m. (Saskatchewan time), February 28(29).

International applicants are not currently considered for admission to this high-demand program.

Medical Radiologic Technology is a nationally accredited two-year diploma program offered at Saskatchewan Polytechnic Saskatoon campus . You’ll get hands-on training in the use of radiographic equipment, learn how to position patients to get the best images and learn to critique images. You’ll also develop knowledge and skills in:

  • anatomy and physiology
  • examination techniques
  • patient care
  • professionalism
  • radiation safety and protection
  • X-ray equipment

Practical, Hands-On Learning

Extensive clinical experience gives you a chance to apply what you learn in class in an actual clinical setting. You’ll get 50 weeks of clinical experience, including one week in your first year and the remaining 49 weeks during three separate practicums in your second year. When you graduate, you’ll be competent in radiographic procedures as applied to the human body.

Diploma to Degree

You can use your Medical Radiologic Technology diploma to ladder into a degree program at the University of Regina or Athabasca University in Alberta. A degree is usually required if you are interested in moving into management or teaching positions.

Nationally Accredited

After graduation, you’ll write the national Canadian Association of Medical Radiation Technologists (CAMRT) certification exam. CAMRT certification allows you to work anywhere in Canada and to become a member of the Saskatchewan Association of Medical Radiation Technologists (SAMRT), which is a requirement to work in Saskatchewan.

Learning Environment

Each year, 20 students are accepted to this program. In the first year, students will experience a mix of traditional lectures, web-assisted learning, practical and simulation labs. Second year students continue their learning in a clinical practicum in either the Saskatoon or Regina Qu’Appelle health regions.  

For this program, there is a heavy workload with 15 - 20 hours/week of homework. School hours are 8:00 a.m. - 4:00 p.m., Monday - Friday except during clinical practicums where hours will coincide with health care hours.

Serve in the Canadian Forces

Saskatchewan Polytechnic's Medical Radiologic Technology program is recognized by the Canadian Forces, which means you can qualify for CF Paid Education funding. On graduation, you’ll also receive advanced standing as a Medical Radiation Technologist, which earns you a higher pay rate than graduates of non-CF recognized programs. Visit cafcod-rpfcfac.forces.gc.ca for more information.

Career and Salary Information

Your Career

There are many career options open to nationally certified medical radiological technologists (MRTs). Choose a career in general radiography or specialize in computerized tomography, mammography or angiography. Hospitals are a major employer, but you also might work in a radiology clinic, cancer clinic, community health centre or private medical clinic. You could also explore careers in veterinary clinics, educational institutes and equipment sales.

Potential Careers

Sample Job TitleNOC Classification1Earning Potential2
Medical Radiation TechnologistMedical Radiation Technologists (3215)$64,500 - $87,400
Radiography TechnologistMedical Radiation Technologists (3215)$64,500 - $87,400
X-Ray TechnologistMedical Radiation Technologists (3215)$64,500 - $87,400

What's the Work Like?

Take x-rays and perform radiographic procedures in various areas within a clinic or hospital, such as the:

  • X-ray department including computed tomography (CT) and angiography suites;
  • Patient’s hospital room;
  • Operating room during surgery;
  • Emergency department in trauma situations;
  • Neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) on premature newborns;
  • Pediatric ward on infants and children;
  • Intensive care unit (ICU);
  • Cardiac care unit (CCU); and
  • Morgue.

Communicate and interact professionally with people, including:

  • Patients and their families;
  • Other MRTs and MRT students;
  • Radiologists;
  • Nurses;
  • Doctors;
  • Paramedics and;
  • Other health professionals, such as Medical Laboratory Technologists, Physiotherapists, Speech Pathologists, etc.

Position patients to obtain optimal images for the pathology in question.

  • Communicate clearly with the patient what you are going to do as well as what you need the patient to do.
  • Communicate professionally and compassionately with family members of patients who may be present.
  • Touch the patient when helping to position them for radiographic procedures.
  • Use personal protective equipment (PPE) to protect yourself when dealing with patients and equipment.
  • Ensure patient safety throughout procedures.

While performing procedures you may be required to:

  • Assist the patient with removing hearing aids and dentures
  • Comfort and assist patients who may be fearful, have dementia or be in pain.
  • Assist patients who are nauseous, vomiting or have diarrhea.
  • Take X-rays of patients in trauma situations and operating rooms where you will be exposed to blood and body fluids.

Procedures that you may not be aware an MRT and MRT student will do include:

  • Performing venipunctures (give needles) to start IVs for the administration of contrast media.
  • Assist with barium enema tip insertions.

Interests

Interests describe what people enjoy doing often in the course of a day. Individuals in this program often enjoy:

  • Working with things such as machines, tools and equipment
  • Using my hands to make or fix things
  • Using my body to do physical work
  • Talking about my own feelings or those of others
  • Persuading or directing others and taking a leadership role
  • Working in ever-changing and high stress health care environments
  • Working with changing technology

Values

Values describe what the potential students have a high regard for, what gives meaning to their work and their lives, and what things they will work hard for:

  • Seeing a finished product or visible results from their efforts
  • Being able to work and think independently
  • A strong work ethic and committed to professional development

Aptitudes/strengths

Aptitudes or strengths are natural abilities, talents and general suitability for learning in a particular field.  An example is a musical aptitude/talent where people have a natural ability; therefore, it is easier for them to develop skills in this area.  Another example is mechanical ability.  People with this natural talent are able to learn mechanical skills more easily than others who lack the suitability. 

  • Mechanical ability - understanding and using the principles involved in building and repairing things
  • Physical ability - talent for physical movement and coordination
  • Scientific ability - understanding scientific principles, investigating and problem solving using the scientific method
  • Mathematical ability - understanding the theory and processes of mathematics
  • Spatial ability - can visualize what something will look like from a drawing, diagram or blueprint or can take a 3 dimensional object and draw it in 2 dimensions
  • Ability to pay careful attention to detail and follow instructions closely

Entrance skills

A skill is learned and developed.  It is the learned capacity to do something that has been practiced and worked on until it can be done easily. It is expected that individuals entering the program will have developed a reasonable level of skill in the following areas in order to successfully complete the program:

  • Physical skills which include strength, coordination and endurance
  • Manual skills that involve eye/hand coordination and manipulating things with my hands or fingers
  • Working with mathematical ideas and knowledge of basic mathematics processes
  • Analyzing information to help solve problems
  • Thinking outside of the box adapting the typical procedure for patients that are unable to move or participate in the process
  • Getting along well with others, individually and in teams
  • Making decisions which affect people or organizations
  • Setting up and keeping accurate records
  • Working on computers to do word processing and organizing information
  • General skills that are essential for entering any one of the Medical Diagnostic programs (including analytical and critical thinking skills, time management skills, prioritizing skills, flexibility and adaptability)

The purpose of this section is to give you an understanding of this career field and to help you make more informed career decisions
There are 9 skill categories with examples of how workers use them on the job. The categories are: Reading, Using Documents, Writing, Math, Oral Communication, Thinking Skills, Working with Others, Computer Use and Continuous Learning. This section is based on the more detailed Essential Skills developed by Human Resources and Skills Development Canada.

  • Read emails, inter-office memos, newsletters, safety manuals, policies and procedures manuals, and medical and scientific journals
  • Read requisitions from doctors on which tests are to be performed
  • Read forms to obtain information on tests

Using documents refers to tasks that involve a variety of information displays in which words, numbers, icons and other visual characteristics appear. It may involve reading, writing and/or creating. 

  • Interpreting the quality of x-rays
  • Read work schedules and complete time sheets
  • Complete patient requisition forms
  • Document work where required on forms
  • Fill in time sheets
  • Write short explanatory letters, interoffice memos and email messages about work progress and concerns
  • Record procedure information
  • Write essays and articles for journals
  • Add, subtract, multiply or divide:
    • Whole Numbers  (for example, 5 and 23) - for example, working with inventory, setting techniques on the equipment and filing
    • Fractions  (for example, 1/5 and 3/18) - for example, making technique charts to determine settings for x-ray machines.  How much kilovoltage and milliamps/second need to be set to produce enough x-rays to ensure diagnostic image results? Used in the numerous quality control tests that are performed on the x-ray equipment
    • Decimals (for example,  8.50 and .75) - for example, setting techniques on the x-ray equipment depending on the equipment
    • Rate, Ratio and Proportion - use a rate showing comparison between two quantities with different units.  For example, used in quality control testing (such as film reject/repeat analysis)
    • Measurement Conversions - converting measurements between the metric and imperial measurement systems (such as from inches to centimeters when determining film/cassette sizes and from gallons to litres when mixing film processing chemistry)
    • Some of the measurement instruments used include calipers, thermometers, graduated cylinders and various types of meters for quality control testsAbility to use a scientific calculator
  • Communicate with patients to get information, to give information and/or to reassure them
  • Communicate with other health care workers (such as co-workers, supervisors, nurses and doctors)
  • May give presentations to co-workers, students and to professional associations and conferences
  • Communication may be difficult when there is noise from trauma, operating room equipment (for example, drills, saws and cautery), when the patient’s first language is not English, with some physical and/or mentally disabled patients, with fearful patients, with young children who cannot talk and/or patients under the influence of alcohol and drugs
Problem solving (1 of 5 thinking skills )
  • Deal with lab equipment and machinery breakdown - troubleshoot
  • Investigate problems with turnaround time
  • Deal with missing x-ray films and patients
  • Prioritize patients according to levels of care needed
  • Deal with personality conflicts in ever changing, high stress work environments
  • Deal with hierarchy of roles and influence - for example, technologist versus doctor

A typical example of problem solving required in the program is when the film processor jams and your film is caught inside.  It is often up to the technologist to determine where the film is caught, what caused it and to determine if it can be fixed or if service needs to be called in.

Decision making (2 of 5 thinking skills)
This refers to making a choice among options. Decision making occurs during problem solving but not all decision making is part of problem solving. Therefore, it is presented as a separate thinking skill. For example, buyers for retail outlets regularly make decisions about which suppliers to buy from and they select among the options for particular types of merchandise. This is not problem solving.

  • Decide whether x-ray film is acceptable - in terms of quality, anatomy and diagnostic value
  • Select the appropriate equipment for certain procedures
  • Decide on what order to take the images
  • Decide how to take images - may need to adapt normal procedures to fit patient's condition
  • Decide when to ask for help (such as when completing certain procedures and moving and lifting patients)
  • Use professional judgment to determine benefits versus risks for the patient

Job task planning and organizing (3 of 5 thinking skills)

  • Although the duties are usually assigned and scheduled by the supervisor, the technologist will usually organize his/her own daily schedule
  • Work is often organized within priorities
  • Emergencies often disrupt a work schedule 
  • Work is coordinated with other co-workers for certain tests

Significant use of memory (4 of 5 thinking skills)

  • Remember where they were in a procedure when they were interrupted
  • Remember what procedures are used for which tasks
  • Remember past interaction(s) with patients when working with patients
  • Remember the location of supplies and equipment and which ones to use
  • Remember specific doctor protocols
  • Remember techniques and how to adapt

Finding information (5 of 5 thinking skills)

  • Use reference and procedure manuals, scientific and medical journals
  • Use institutional and computer databases
  • Talk to other health care workers such as co-workers, supervisors, nurses and doctors
May work independently or as part of a team depending on the department size and shift
  • Basic knowledge and operation of computerized equipment is becoming more and more necessary - examples include CT scanners (computed tomography), MRI scanner (magnetic resonance imaging), PAC system (Picture archiving communication) and digital radiography
  • Use database to access patient information
  • Learning is through on the job training, from other co-workers, employer sponsored training and professional conferences

When investigating this career, you are encouraged to:

Length and Start Date

Start Date(s):

September



Length:

90 weeks


Year 1 - 41 weeks; Year 2 - 49 weeks

Locations

  • Saskatoon

Admissions

Admission Requirements

  • Grade 12 with a minimum grade of 70% in English Language Arts A30, English Language Arts B30, Foundations of Math 30 or Pre-Calculus 30*, Physical Science 20*, Chemistry 30 and Biology 30
  • English Language Requirement

*Previous Saskatchewan mathematics and physics requirements also accepted:

  • Minimum of 70% in Math B30
  • Minimum of 70% in Physics 20

Note

  • Physics 30 will not be substituted for Physical Science 20 or Physics 20.
  • Accepted applicants will be required to provide evidence of a Criminal Record Check and Vulnerable Sector Search upon admission into the program. At the discretion of the practicum agency, you may be declined access to a clinical or work placement based on the contents of the Criminal Record Check and Vulnerable Sector Search. The cost of the Criminal Record Check and Vulnerable Sector Search is your responsibility.
  • CPR Heartsaver " C" AED or equivalent is required prior to entry into the clinical practicum. (Standard First Aid is no longer required).
  • Effective July 1, 2015: Accepted applicants are required to provide current immunization records and meet Saskatchewan Polytechnic immunization requirements prior to entry into clinical practicum.
  • Accepted applicants will be required to provide evidence of Transferring Lifting Repositioning (TLR®) certification upon admission into the program.
  • Applicants are also required to submit career investigations and awareness questionnaires by February 28(29).

Clinical Practicum Experiences:

  • Fifty weeks of clinical practicum (which includes 1 week in Year 1 and 49 weeks in Year 2) are located in either Regina or Saskatoon.

Clinical practicum experiences are assigned by the Medical Diagnostics Committee on Practicum Placements (COPP). There are limited clinical placements in each location. Enrolment in the program will require acceptance of the clinical placement as assigned and this placement may be outside of Saskatoon.

Admission Method

High Demand

High-demand programs consistently have more applicants than spaces available at each Saskatchewan Polytechnic location at which they are offered. High-demand programs have admission requirements plus additional selection criteria. The application period for high-demand programs is 8:00 a.m., October 1, to 4:30 p.m., February 15 (Saskatchewan times), each academic year. All supporting documentation is required by 4:30 p.m. (Saskatchewan time), February 28(29).

See Admission Processes for more information about this method of admission.

Selection Criteria

For required information on preparing your application, refer to the Selection Process Guide for Applicants.

  • Phase I for High School Graduates: The admission average is calculated from the final marks in high school courses required for admission to the program. The high school average will be compared to any grade point average(s) (UGPA) presented for a minimum of 30 passed post-secondary credits from a recognized post-secondary institution - and the highest average considered for admission. Such applicants must be in good standing with the institution. If transcripts from more than one post-secondary institution are submitted, the highest UGPA will be considered against the high school average. Applicants are then ranked in the order of the highest averages.
  • Phase I for Current High School Students: The admission average is calculated from final marks provided by February 28(29). Conditional admission may be granted on this basis. Current high school students must order transcripts to be sent directly to Saskatchewan Polytechnic at the end of Semester 1 and the end of Semester 2 of the grade 12 year. The final grade 12 mark will be used where the course is completed. The final grade 11 mark will be used only in the absence of the grade 12 mark in the same subject.
  • Completion of Career Investigation Report. See the Career Investigation – Applicant's Guidelines for Composition.
  • Completion of Awareness Questionnaire
  • Phase II: Additional selection criteria will be applied to those with the highest averages in Phase I:
    • Admission average = 30%
    • Career investigation = 30%
    • Interview = 40%

Tuition and Fees

Estimates are based on current rates and are subject to change. Amounts for a program may vary by campus. Totals shown here include all mandatory fees as well as books and supplies. For a complete breakdown of tuition and fees for this program, click here to access the Saskatchewan Polytechnic campus Tuition and Fee Schedules.

 

Year 1 - $10,200
Year 2 - $9,700

Courses

Expand All +

Year 1

Code
Name/Description
Credits
 
APHY 191
Anatomy and Physiology 1
3
Show course details
You will explore the structure and function of organs and systems in the normal human body. Your studies will focus on the integumentary, skeletal, muscular, nervous and endocrine systems.
Credit Units: 3
Course Hours: 42.0
Equivalent Course(s):
Potential Learning Method(s): Prior Learning, Online, Print Distance Individual, Lecture/Theory, Print Distance Group
APHY 282
Anatomy and Physiology 2
3
Show course details
Building on the knowledge gained in APHY 191 (Anatomy and Physiology 1), you will continue your study of the structure and function of the normal human body. Your studies will focus on the cardiovascular, immune, respiratory, digestive, urinary and reproductive systems.
Credit Units: 3
Course Hours: 38.0
Prerequisites(s): APHY 191
Potential Learning Method(s): Prior Learning, Online, Print Distance Individual, Lecture/Theory, Print Distance Group
CLIN 192
Clinical Introduction
2
Show course details
You will participate in a supervised clinical experience at an assigned clinical site. You will observe radiographic procedures in the various areas of the clinical site where they may be performed.
Credit Units: 2
Course Hours: 36.0
Prerequisites(s): INFC 180, ETHC 185
Potential Learning Method(s): Online, Clinical/Practicum
ETHC 181
Patient Care in Radiography 1
2
Show course details
You will learn the radiographer’s role in basic patient care when performing medical imaging procedures. You will learn about documentation in health care, isolation and transmission based precautions, and assessment of patients’ physical status. You will apply transferring techniques and learn about patient personal care assistance, identification of emergency procedures and recognition of basic medical accessory equipment.
Credit Units: 2
Course Hours: 37.0
Prerequisites(s): INFC 180
Potential Learning Method(s): Online, Lecture/Lab
ETHC 182
Patient Care in Radiography 2
2
Show course details
You will learn the radiographer’s role in patient care when performing advanced medical imaging procedures involving surgical asepsis, medication administration, intravenous therapy and contrast media administration.
Credit Units: 2
Course Hours: 36.0
Prerequisites(s): ETHC 181
Potential Learning Method(s): Online, Lecture/Lab
ETHC 185
Professional Practices 1
3
Show course details
You will receive an introduction to health care and health care delivery systems. You will study the legal and ethical issues faced by health care professionals. You will discuss interpersonal and employability skills required in health care professions with an emphasis on teamwork, communication and stress management. You will learn methods to deal with grief and loss, in addition to skills and techniques for critical thinking and conflict management.
Credit Units: 3
Course Hours: 42.0
Equivalent Course(s): HUMR 182
Potential Learning Method(s): Prior Learning, Lecture/Theory, Print Distance Group
ETHC 280
Professional Practices 2
2
Show course details
You will study health care organizational behaviour and the skills required for leadership/management roles. You will discuss co-operative work relationships, conflict resolution, budgeting, strategic planning, the collective bargaining process and workload measurements. You will develop workplace documents and demonstrate job search techniques.
Credit Units: 2
Course Hours: 30.0
Potential Learning Method(s): Prior Learning, Online, Lecture/Theory, Print Distance Group
IMRC 182
Image Recording Introduction
2
Show course details
Your studies will focus on the fundamentals of radiographic processing. You will learn about screen and film combinations, operating and maintaining processors, film fault analysis, darkrooms and facets of quality control relating to x-ray film processing.
Credit Units: 2
Course Hours: 37.0
Potential Learning Method(s): Online, Lecture/Lab
IMRC 183
Image Acquisition & Processing
4
Show course details
You will learn the factors affecting radiographic qualities and how to develop a technique chart. You will study the theory of how modern radiographic equipment works, as well as the theory and application of digital image acquisition, processing, archiving, and quality control.
Credit Units: 4
Course Hours: 53.0
Potential Learning Method(s): Online, Lecture/Lab
INFC 180
Infection Control and Safety
2
Show course details
You will study the transmission of microorganisms, blood-borne pathogens (i.e. hepatitis virus and HIV), standard precautions, isolation procedures, immunization for medical workers, sterilization and disinfection, biohazard waste, safety and WHMIS.
Credit Units: 2
Course Hours: 25.0
Potential Learning Method(s): Prior Learning, Online, Print Distance Individual, Lecture/Lab, Print Distance Group
MTER 180
Medical Terminology
1
Show course details
You will learn to use the prefixes, suffixes and combining forms from which medical terms are derived. You will also learn to use medical abbreviations.
Credit Units: 1
Course Hours: 10.0
Equivalent Course(s): MED 161
Potential Learning Method(s): Prior Learning, Online, Print Distance Individual, Lecture/Theory, Print Distance Group
PATH 179
Radiographic Pathology 1
2
Show course details
You will learn how to identify the pathological conditions of specific body systems as demonstrated on radiographs. At course completion, you will be able to use the required radiographic qualities to adequately illustrate the pathology in question.
Credit Units: 2
Course Hours: 33.0
Prerequisites(s): RGAN 180
Potential Learning Method(s): Prior Learning, Online, Lecture/Theory, Print Distance Group
PATH 184
Radiographic Pathology 2
2
Show course details
Building on the knowledge you gained in PATH 179 (Radiographic Pathology 1), you will continue to learn how to identify pathological conditions relative to radiographic appearance and which projection/view would best demonstrate them. You will discuss adjustments in exposure factors and general disease processes.
Credit Units: 2
Course Hours: 23.0
Prerequisites(s): PATH 179
Potential Learning Method(s): Online, Lecture/Theory
PHYS 184
Physics
3
Show course details
You will be introduced to physics concepts applicable to the principles of operating x-ray generating equipment, image formation, and radiation protection.
Credit Units: 3
Course Hours: 38.0
Potential Learning Method(s): Online, Lecture/Theory
RDBG 184
Radiobiology and Protection
2
Show course details
You will be introduced to radiobiology and protection. You will acquire the knowledge and develop the skills needed to practice basic radiation protection during radiological examinations. The course content includes the biological effects of ionizing radiation, basic radiation protection principles and concepts, radiation monitoring, radiation protection guidelines and safety regulations, and techniques of minimizing patient dose during diagnostic imaging.
Credit Units: 2
Course Hours: 30.0
Potential Learning Method(s): Prior Learning, Online, Lecture/Lab, Print Distance Group
RDGR 179
Radiographic Technique 1
5
Show course details
You will learn the theory and develop the skills of radiographic positioning and image critique for the appendicular skeleton.
Credit Units: 5
Course Hours: 68.0
Prerequisites(s): RGAN 180(concurrent)
Corequisites(s):
Potential Learning Method(s): Online, Lecture/Lab
RDGR 180
Radiographic Technique 2
4
Show course details
Building on the theory and skills learned in RDGR 179 (Radiographic Technique 1) you will learn the theory and develop the skills of radiographic positioning and image critique for the axial skeleton.
Credit Units: 4
Course Hours: 60.0
Prerequisites(s): RDGR 179
Potential Learning Method(s): Online, Lecture/Lab
RDGR 190
Fluoroscopy
2
Show course details
You will learn how fluoroscopic equipment and related accessories function and operate. You will learn how to describe various fluoroscopic examinations within the department and in the surgical suite. You will also learn how to identify the radiographic appearance of organs and structures for various views and projections used in fluoroscopic examinations.
Credit Units: 2
Course Hours: 35.0
Prerequisites(s): RDGR 180(concurrent)
Potential Learning Method(s): Prior Learning, Online, Lecture/Lab
RDGR 283
Advanced Radiographic Technique 1
2
Show course details
You will learn about radiographic techniques used for localizing foreign bodies in the human body. You will discuss variations in techniques used for pediatric and geriatric patients. You will also learn the basic principles used in trauma radiography and mobile radiography.
Credit Units: 2
Course Hours: 32.0
Prerequisites(s): RDGR 180
Potential Learning Method(s): Online, Lecture/Lab
RDGR 284
Advanced Radiographic Technique 2
2
Show course details
You will learn how to describe specialized equipment and examinations of various body systems. You will also learn how to identify the radiographic appearance of specialized structures and/or systems specific to views and projections used in these examinations
Credit Units: 2
Course Hours: 35.0
Prerequisites(s): RDGR 180
Potential Learning Method(s): Online, Lecture/Theory
RDTM 280
Computed Tomography
2
Show course details
You will learn about the history and development of computed tomography (CT) scanners. You will learn about the specialized equipment and accessories used for CT scanning. You will study the principles of acquisition, reconstruction, post-processing and storage of CT images. You will learn about image quality, artifacts and quality control procedures, as well as use of contrast media and radiation dose in CT.
Credit Units: 2
Course Hours: 35.0
Prerequisites(s): IMRC 183, RSAP 180
Potential Learning Method(s): Prior Learning, Lecture/Theory
RDTM 281
Sectional Anatomy
3
Show course details
You will learn to identify the sectional anatomy of the head, neck, chest, abdomen and pelvis on computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) images in transverse, coronal and sagittal planes. You will discuss topographical anatomy to aid in sectional anatomy and basic CT procedures.
Credit Units: 3
Course Hours: 38.0
Prerequisites(s): APHY 282, RGAN 180
Potential Learning Method(s): Prior Learning, Online, Lecture/Theory
RGAN 180
Radiographic Anatomy
3
Show course details
Your studies will focus on identifying the skeletal, thoracic, abdominal and respiratory anatomy in radiographic images. Topographical anatomy will be discussed to aid in radiographic positioning.
Credit Units: 3
Course Hours: 44.0
Prerequisites(s): MTER 180, APHY 191(concurrent), APHY 282(concurrent)
Potential Learning Method(s): Prior Learning, Online, Lecture/Theory
RSAP 180
Radiation Science and Apparatus 1
3
Show course details
You will be introduced to the function and operation of basic x-ray equipment in producing radiation. You will also study quality control and how it is applied in a practical setting.
Credit Units: 3
Course Hours: 40.0
Prerequisites(s): PHYS 184(concurrent)
Potential Learning Method(s): Online, Lecture/Lab
SIMU 281
Clinical Preparation
8
Show course details
You will participate in a 120 hour simulation designed to prepare you for your first clinical experience. The course will focus on skill development in the areas of patient care, diagnostic imaging procedures, equipment operation and quality control procedures. You will assume a variety of roles as you engage in authentic scenarios typically encountered in clinical radiographic practice. This experience will assist you to correlate your theory to real patient situations. Your ability to apply general employability skills will be stressed.
Credit Units: 8
Course Hours: 120.0
Prerequisites(s): ETHC 182, ETHC 280, RDGR 190, IMRC 182, IMRC 183, PATH 184, RDBG 184, RDGR 283, RDGR 284, RDTM 280, RDTM 281
Potential Learning Method(s): Online, Lab/Practical

Year 2

Code
Name/Description
Credits
 
CLIN 295
Clinical Radiography 1
43
Show course details
You will participate in a supervised clinical experience at an assigned clinical site. You will develop basic radiographic skills in patient positioning, image critique and patient care. You will be introduced to advanced radiographic procedures.
Credit Units: 43
Course Hours: 648.0
Prerequisites(s): SIMU 281
Potential Learning Method(s): Online, Clinical/Practicum
CLIN 296
Clinical Radiography 2
43
Show course details
You will participate in a supervised clinical experience at an assigned clinical site. You will maintain and build on competencies and skills acquired in CLIN 295 (Clinical Radiography 1). You will continue to develop radiographic skills in patient positioning, image critique and patient care. You will perform advanced radiographic procedures.
Credit Units: 43
Course Hours: 648.0
Prerequisites(s): CLIN 295
Potential Learning Method(s): Online, Clinical/Practicum
CLIN 297
Clinical Radiography 3
29
Show course details
You will participate in a supervised clinical experience at an assigned clinical site. You will maintain and build on skills developed in CLIN 296 (Clinical Radiography 2). You will continue to develop radiographic skills in patient positioning, image critique and patient care. You will perform general and advanced radiographic procedures with minimal supervision.
Credit Units: 29
Course Hours: 432.0
Prerequisites(s): CLIN 296
Potential Learning Method(s): Online, Clinical/Practicum
RSCH 280
Applied Investigation
1
Show course details
You will receive an introduction to research concepts, methodologies and issues in health. You will demonstrate the practical application of research techniques.
Credit Units: 1
Course Hours: 22.0
Prerequisites(s): (APHY 282, BIOL 181, CHEM 184, CHEM 288, ETHC 185, ETHC 280, HEMA 283, HEMA 188, HEMA 189, HSTC 187, MICR 189, PATH 181, QC 193, QC 194, TRFS 182) or SIMU 281
Equivalent Course(s): COMM 289
Potential Learning Method(s): Prior Learning, Online, Lecture/Theory

PLAR & Transfer Credit

Prior Learning Assessment and Recognition

Saskatchewan Polytechnic recognizes that adults learn in many different ways and through many different means. This includes acquiring knowledge and skills through life and work experience or non-formal training. A detailed Candidate Guide, which includes a self-audit for all PLAR-ready courses, has been developed for this program. This information guides a candidate through all steps in the PLAR process.


Transfer Credit

Many Saskatchewan Polytechnic students benefit from transferring credit. You may be eligible to transfer credit from or to another college or university. To learn more, visit our transfer credit web page.

 

Student Awards

Thanks to the generosity of donors and alumni, Saskatchewan Polytechnic gives away more than $2 million in student awards during the academic year.

Saskatchewan Polytechnic offers student awards for every certificate and diploma program at every campus. You don't have to be a brainiac to receive a student award. Not all student awards are based on marks - some are based on financial need or things like community or volunteer involvement.

More about scholarships

Accreditation

Canadian Medical Association, valid 6 years until December 2016.

Additional Information

Related Programs

  • Application is now closed
  • Call Us
    Phone Icon1-866-467-4278
    ©